Ways to Manage Grief During Covid-19

Under the current circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic, we are met with more challenges in our daily lives. The already painful experience of grieving has become worse for families. In order to manage this grief, it is important to find suitable coping mechanisms. This can be done by reflecting on similar past experiences and the […]
Jun 08, 2020
Reading Time: 2 min

Under the current circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic, we are met with more challenges in our daily lives. The already painful experience of grieving has become worse for families. In order to manage this grief, it is important to find suitable coping mechanisms. This can be done by reflecting on similar past experiences and the methods that were used to cope. Additionally, one might need to find alternatives to coping methods to stay within COVID-19 guidelines. 

Reaching out to family and friends through the internet. Because of social distancing, many online platforms have become more available. These platforms such as Skype, Zoom, and Google Hangouts make it easier to talk to loved ones. if you're having a hard time with, try to schedule a specific time to connect-- you are more likely to follow through when arranging something in advance.
Find Professional support from online therapists. Some possible options include Talkspace, Betterhelp, Amwell, Doctors on Demand, and MDWell. In addition to these recommendations, there are many other free or paid options.
Links! Talkspace, Betterhelp, Amwell, Doctors on Demand, and MDWell
Focus on your thoughts. Take time to let yourself grieve and allow yourself to experience emotions such as sadness, anxiety, loneliness, regret, anger, and guilt. After the initial grieving process, you must understand there are many things that are out of your control. Then, focus on what you can do. If you are experiencing guilt, try not to blame yourself for the events that have occurred.
Practice self-care. Some steps to care for yourself include keeping a good diet, exercising 30-minutes every day, going on walks outside, and getting adequate rest (recommended sleep for each age group).
Here is the recommended sleep for each age group.
Practice mindfulness. It can be helpful to take a few hours or days to unplug and take a pause. During this time, you can pick up a book or try out a new hobby. Other ways to be mindful include journaling, creating a gratitude list, listening to guided meditations, etc.
Alternate between "loss" and "restorative" activities. The dual-process approach to grief suggests that people move been loss-related activities and restorative exercises. Some loss-related activities include looking at photos of the deceased, crying, and talking about the person you recently lost. Restorative exercises include making plans for the future and spending time on hobbies. Try to find a nice balance between these two activities to promote faster healing.
Stay Positive. After the initial stages of grieving, it is healthy to slowly transition into building an optimistic mindset. Studies have shown that staying positive in a crisis may help to improve well-being. While still keeping up healthy coping mechanisms (self-care, mindfulness, etc), start to incorporate more and more of your daily routine prior to your loss. Incorporating the same activities into our daily routine is important; they provide stability and balance in our lives. Keeping up a healthy and consistent routine will promote emotional wellbeing during unpredictable times.
Studies have shown that staying positive in a crisis may help to improve well-being.

Looking for more tips and advice? Click here for more: https://therelayresource.com/tips-advice/

Here are several related Relay articles:

References:

The New York Times – How to Reduce Your Risk of PTSD in a Post-COVID-19 World

National Center for Biotechnology Information – “What Good Are Positive Emotions in Crises?”

Psychology Today – Coping with Coronavirus Stress

Very Well Mind – Understanding Grief in the Age of the COVID-19 Pandemic

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